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Wanna work faster in Excel !!

Keyboard Shortcut to Go To Formula Bar

 To enter formulas in an Excel worksheet, just select a cell and start typing. To edit an existing formula, you probably make changes in the Formula bar (above the column headings) which you can access with a click of the mouse. That method’s fine but some people (like me) prefer working with the keyboard as much as possible. If that describes you, press the [F2] function key instead of reaching for the mouse the next time you want to edit an existing formula.

Excel Shortcuts for Editing a Cell

When you use [F2] to edit a cell, by default, [F2] positions the cursor in the cell (for “in place editing”) instead of the Formula bar. To change the [F2] function key so it moves directly to the Formula bar:

Excel 2007:

  • Click the Office button and then pick Excel Options (at the bottom right).
  • Select Advanced in the left pane.
  • Uncheck the Allow editing directly in cell option. OK to apply.

Excel 2010:

  •  Click the File tab and then pick Options (at the left).
  • Select Advanced in the left pane.
  • Uncheck the Allow editing directly in cell option. OK to apply.

Turn Formula AutoComplete on or off

Click the Microsoft Office Button , click Excel Options, and then click the Formulas category.

Under Working with formulas, select or clear Formula AutoComplete.

TIP   You can also press ALT+DOWN ARROW.

Enter an item from the drop-down list by using an insert trigger

 As you are typing a formula, even after using an insert trigger, don’t forget to type the closing parenthesis for a function, closing bracket for a table reference, or closing quotation mark for an MDX text string.

To insert the selected item into the formula and put the insertion point directly after it, press TAB, or double-click the item.

Hope this would help you to make your work more faster. Feel free to drop mails at thinkandbegin@gmail.com

 
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Posted by on March 19, 2012 in MS Excel, My Home

 

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The One-Click Chart Method

You have to create a bunch of charts. You usually select all of the defaults in the Chart Wizard. Can you speed up the process?

The Excel Chart Wizard is a very useful tool, especially if you’re making several changes to the standard chart format or you want a little guidance on what type of chart to create from your data. At other times, the Chart Wizard just seems to get in the way and it can slow you down. This is particularly true if you need to create several Excel charts, and you want the task done as fast as possible.

If you’re faced with this latter scenario, there is a much quicker way to get the job done – you actually can create a chart from your data with a single click.

You can create a chart with one keystroke! Select the data, including the headings and row labels, as shown in Figure.

Press the F11 key or (Alt+F1). Try both and see the difference. The data is charted (on a new chart in case of F11)  sheet, as shown in Fig

Hope this will help you in some context.

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2012 in MS Excel, My Home

 

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“Consolidate” in MS Excel

To summarize and report results from data on separate worksheets, you can consolidate the data from each separate worksheet into one worksheet (or master worksheet). The worksheets you consolidate can be in the same workbook as the master worksheet or in other workbooks. When you consolidate data in one worksheet, you can more easily update and aggregate it on a regular or ad hoc basis.

For example, if you have a worksheet of expense figures for each of your regional offices, you might use data consolidation to roll up these figures into a corporate expense worksheet. This master worksheet might contain sales totals and averages, current inventory levels, and highest selling products for the entire enterprise.

There are two main ways to consolidate data:

Consolidate by position    Use this method when the data from multiple source areas is arranged in the same order and uses the same row and column labels. For example, when you have a series of expense worksheets that are created from the same template.

Consolidate by category    Use this method when the data from multiple source areas is arrange differently, but the same row and column labels are used. For example, you can use this method when you have a series of inventory worksheets for each month that use the same layout, but each worksheet contains different items or a different number of items.

You can consolidate data by using the Consolidate command (Data tab, Data Tools group). You can also consolidate data by using a formula or a PivotTable report.

For more details pls visit youtube or reply me for reference.

 
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Posted by on February 19, 2012 in MS Excel, My Home

 

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Very Useful MS Excel Short-Cuts

Here are very few but very useful MS Excel short-cut keys which will not only make your work easier but also make your work more faster and accurate….. Just try it out…….

Ctrl+H

Find&Replace
Ctrl+F4, Alt+F4 Close, Close Excel
Ctrl+Arrow Move to edge of region
Ctrl+* Select current region
Ctrl+Home Ctrl+End Select A1, Select last cell in used range
Ctrl+Shift+End Select from active cell to last cell in used range.
Ctrl+Shift+Home Select from active cell to A1
Ctrl+Page Down Ctrl+Page Up Move to the next sheet, Move to the previous sheet
Ctrl+Tab Move to next open workbook
Ctrl+N Open new workbook
Shift+F11 Insert new worksheet
Shift+F3 Paste function window
Ctrl+Spacebar Shift+Spacebar Select columns, Select rows
Ctrl+; , Ctrl+shift+: Current date, Current time
 
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Posted by on February 12, 2012 in MS Excel, My Home

 

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Tips for more comfortable use of MS Excel

Access keyboard shortcuts to help you work with the data in your spreadsheets without having to scroll through menus. These one-stop guides help you become familiar with the basic keyboard shortcuts for Excel 2010 and Excel 2007.

The ribbon, a graphical toolbar that makes it simple to build and use spreadsheets, is your key to creating useful spreadsheets. The ribbon saves you time and enables you access to a huge toolbox of visual and computational tricks. To learn more about the basic and advanced features it offers (including user customizability in Excel 2010), see the following 2010 edition video or this article on the function the Ribbon plays in Excel 2007.

Conditional formatting allows you to automatically change the appearance of cells that meet specific, user-defined criteria. Conditional formatting lets you quickly identify important data points such as top-performing students or salesmen. Here’s how to take advantage of it this feature in Excel 2010 and Excel 2007.

Using the Microsoft Excel Web App, you can access spreadsheets from anywhere with your web browser or easily share and collaborate in-real time with friends and colleagues. The Web App is a convenient solution to tackle group projects.

Power Pivot for Excel 2010, a free downloadable add-on, offers even more muscle for performing calculations that involve large amounts of data. Users can also easily share spreadsheets which can help with heavy workloads.

Creating charts and graphics

With Excel, you can create colorful pictures and graphs or generate eye-catching reports in minutes that help you identify usage or spending patterns at a glance.

From bar and pie charts to histograms and attention-grabbing sparklines, Excel provides a variety of practical ways to visually represent data, which makes it easier to understand at a glance. These images offer a fast and intuitive way to display information and illustrate points more effectively. Chart options include:

  • Area
  •  Bar
  •  Bubble
  •  Column
  •  Doughnut
  •  Line
  •  Organization
  •  Pie
  •  Radar
  •  Stock
  •  Surface
  •  Scatter Diagram

Detailed PivotTable and PivotChart reports can also help you quickly summarize large amounts of data so that you can browse and assess information in a more streamlined way. See step-by-step procedures for using PivotTables and Pivot Charts for Excel 2010 and Excel 2007. To jazz up your spreadsheets, you can also use pictures, clip art, and other custom graphics.

 

 

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2012 in MS Excel, My Home

 

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